The men and women of Corvette Racing send season's greetings to VETTE readers around the world! Your passion for Corvette and your support of Corvette Racing are what inspire us to keep the world's best sports car ahead of the competition. Whether we're racing in Long Beach or Le Mans, we hope to see you in the New Year!

The Price of "Progress"?
Per Jay Heath's column "Vicious Rumors" ("Idle Chatter," Dec. '09), consider the fact that nobody ever expected to see the DeSoto or Plymouth disappear, much less the Oldsmobile or Pontiac, but they are gone! The Corvette may continue to live, but the engines will certainly get smaller. For those who race, it's very unsettling. But for those who just love driving a great-looking car, the engine size and speed aren't going to be very important. I, for one, won't be surprised to see smaller engines with less power if the Corvette is to live on. M. Free Via the Internet

Carb Correx
In your Nov. '09 issue, there is an article titled "Fuelie Fisticuffs," which compares the L84 and L76 engines from the '64 and '65 model years. I really enjoyed the article, and I'm happy someone finally did this!

However (you knew some kind of whine was coming, right?), the 1964 and 1965 L76 engines did not use a Holley 3310 as stated (and pictured) in the article. They were equipped with 2818 Holleys of the 600-cfm, side-pivot float variety. FYI, the 1964 L76 engine was the first time a Chevrolet motor came from the factory with a Holley carb. John Cork Via the Internet

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