After the LM platform was retired in 1996, Callaway and Woehr began developing a new Corvette-based racer for Le Mans called the C7. It was a radical front-engine GT car that saw little success because of strict rule interpretations by the Le Mans organizers. Only two cars were completed. The original is now in a private collection, while the second one resides in the Old Lyme showroom.

A new C5-based Callaway called the C12 was introduced at the Geneva Auto show in 1998. Built by Woehr and his team in Leingarten, the C12 featured advanced aerodynamics on a stunning body. Only 27 of these beautiful Callaways were sold.

When the C6 arrived in late 2004, Callaway Cars immediately began modifying one. Carlisle Events' Lance Miller commissioned the project, which would ultimately receive a heavily upgraded LS2 engine, along with a tweaked suspension and brakes. Lessons learned from this project helped in the development of a Callaway supercharger package that became available in 2006.

Meanwhile in Germany, Woehr and company were developing a new race car based on the C6 Z06. Named the Z06.R GT3, it was built to compete in the new FIA GT3 championship. The car turned out to be a huge success: To date it has won four FIA GT3 and two UAE GT Championships. Twenty-three examples have been built, and they race in series all over the world (though not in the US).

Around the same time, longtime Callaway collaborator Paul Deutschman completed the design of a new body for a C6-based supercar. Named the C16, the car first appeared at the 2006 LA Auto show. It remains available to this day.

The supercharged-C6 program is another ongoing venture that has proved a tremendous success for Callaway Cars. The package is available on the standard C6 and Grand Sport models (in coupe and topless forms), as well as on the Z06.

To celebrate the B2K option's 25th anniversary, a new limited-edition B2K Corvette was introduced at the National Corvette Museum in April. Reeves Callaway, who was inducted into the NCM's Hall of Fame in 2008, was the keynote speaker. It was a fitting achievement for this modern Renaissance man.