The skull motifs continued to evolve, as evidenced by the flaming black B-pillar design that debuted at Le Mans in 2004. They also proliferated throughout the car, showing up under the engine cover, inside the fenders, and throughout the cockpit. One of Male's fellow truck drivers, Rich Eldred, started sporting skull-and-crossbones suspenders, and other team members followed suit with pirate-themed attire of their own. Soon, the skull was showing up on the hats and clothes worn by the crew.

Around this time, it was discovered that the original skull decal had been a logo sticker for the "No Fear" line of clothes and accessories. Concerned about potential copyright infringement, Corvette Racing officials commissioned a new design. Corvette-themed Web site Badboyvettes.com and Ed Jabbour of Kick Design in New York came up with a new black-and-yellow skull featuring a forward-facing look, jagged teeth, and a Corvette crossed-flags logo forming the eyes and nose.

The new design made its debut on both C6.Rs in 2005, showing up on the front and rear fascias as well as on the B-pillars. It was also prominently displayed on the team's official garb, on most of the crew's equipment, and on the flags flying from the race-car transporters. In a nod to tradition, the small silver skull was allowed to stay on the back panel of the No. 4 car.

The now-famous skull mascot deserved a moniker. Gary Claudio suggested "Jake," calling it, "A no-nonsense name for a tough, no-nonsense team." Jake has since risen to a place of prominence in the Corvette world, adorning posters, a clothing line, and a variety of promotional memorabilia. He represents Corvette Racing's mantra of taking on all comers, meting out punishment, and fighting to the last man. He asks no questions and takes no prisoners, just like the team that spawned his legend.