Along with the engine upgrades, the Street Attack LS7 receives anodized AN oil fittings and braided oil-cooler lines, a Katech-designed billet oil-cooler adapter, a Ron Davis water-to-oil cooler radiator, an SLP 160-degree thermostat, a solid belt tensioner, and a set of Kooks headers.

The headers replace the relatively restrictive stock four-into-one manifolds and flow into a Corsa-supplied three-inch exhaust system. The resulting ruckus reminds everyone in the neighborhood that the LS7 is a racing engine at heart. It may not be a sound suited to all tastes, but a Z06 is hardly a street sleeper. We think Katech is right to deduce that most people writing the zero-laden check for the complete Street Attack package will want the Ferrari guys at the country club to know there's more than enough under the hood to muss an Enzo's hairpiece.

The Street Attack package is also noteworthy for what it doesn't change from stock. The factory's 90mm throttle body, intake manifold, 40-pound fuel injectors, high-flow fuel pump, and coil packs are all left alone.

More than Just Horsepower
Extending beyond the engine compartment, the Street Attack package also includes a SPEC Stage 3 clutch, a Katech-designed clutch bleeder, and a Koolmat trans-tunnel heat shield.

The yellow Z in our photos was equipped with just about every option offered by Katech. That's saying something because, as we mentioned earlier, all of the company's projects are a little different. This car eventually was shipped to a wealthy customer in the Middle East, where cost, emissions regulations, and other trifles were of no object. (Fortunately for the rest of us, all of the items seen on the car are also offered individually, including the great-looking color-coordinated valve covers with ignition-coil-relocation brackets.)

A carbon World Challenge louvered hood (also available in a less expensive fiberglass version), front splitter, and rear spoiler were added as well. Inside the car, it's more of the same: high-class, color-matched upgrades throughout, although they are mostly made of leather, not carbon fiber. Katech is also working on suspension, brake, and other enhancements.

"The sky is absolutely the limit with these cars," says Newman. "If the customer can think of it, we can probably do it."

For us, the bottom line for a package like this is the performance quotient, because no matter how big the splitter or how many louvers in the hood, the car had better back up those race-track looks with commensurate performance. Certainly, 600hp would live up to just about anybody's expectations, but dyno numbers alone aren't the full measure of performance - it's how they're applied, particularly when they're claimed to be "streetable." In that regard, the Street Attack package measures up to our expectations.

If anything, the Street Attack feels almost too docile on the street. It's easy enough to drive, has a race-car rasp to its exhaust note, and slips into hyperspace when the throttle blade goes horizontal. Compared with some peaky, pesky modifieds of only a few years ago, which delivered more drama and compromise for lesser performance, we expected more of a "fight" from the Katech Street Attack.

We didn't get it. Instead, we experienced a blazingly quick, great-sounding, and easily drivable car that exemplifies all the reasons why we're living in the golden age of Corvette performance.