Perhaps because of the erosion in prices for marquee cars, the prices of clones-also known by a number of other euphemisms, such as recreations, tributes, and so on-are way down. The same seems to go for non-numbers-matching cars and modifieds. Again, however, one man's pain is another's pleasure, as enthusiasts looking for a great deal on cars they can drive and enjoy will find plenty of clean, show-worthy machines at prices that are generally less than the build cost.

Nearly 1,800 cars crossed the block during the Indy event; about 66 percent of them sold, for a total of more than $41 million. That was a good sell-through percentage, but it suggested that many sellers were still holding out for 2007-era prices. As we overheard from one bidder, "Some of these guys need a reality check. They don't seem to know what year it is."

Nevertheless, it was a marvelous spectacle of classic American sheetmetal-make that fiberglass. And if you're in the market for your first collector Corvette, there hasn't been a better time in the last 10 years to jump into the fray.

Author's note: Visit www.mecum.com for information on upcoming auctions, as well as results from the Indy event and other previous sales.